Zone 7 Nursery
Nursery & Garden Center Landscape Maintenance Lanscape Design Build

It's Time To...

January

  • Take down the Christmas tree and practice recycling. Some counties offer Christmas tree recycling services at local convenience centers.
  • Put a live root-ball tree outdoors in a cool, protected area. Water it thoroughly and hose off the foliage. Move it into full sun in 2 weeks.
  • Move plants around the yard. Transplant perennials and shrubs as long as the ground is not frozen.
  • Mulch tender plants, such as pansy beds or emerging bulb foliage, with pine needles or shredded mulch.
  • Prune deciduous trees and shrubs; however, do not prune flowering trees until later in the spring after they bloom. (For example: dogwoods, cherry trees and redbuds)
  • Prune fruit trees now, removing dead limbs and any vertical sprouts.
  • Do not prune azaleas, winter camellias, winter daphne, or trees that are “bleeders” such as birch trees or japanese maples.
  • Use insecticidal soap on the tops and undersides of houseplant leaves if insects are detected. Clean the foliage, water regularly and fertilize. Repot as necessary.
  • Continue to spray dormant oil on all evergreens to protect them from insect damage.
  • Take bulbs out of the refrigerator and set them out in the sunlight, as indicated below.

    Bulb

    Remove
    From Cold

    Weeks
    to Bloom

    Tulip

    Jan. 13 to Jan. 21

    3 to 4

    Narcissus

    Jan. 20 to Jan. 27

    2 to 3

    Hyacinth

    Jan. 20 to Jan. 27

    2 to 3

    Muscari

    Jan. 17 to Jan. 24

    2

    Crocus, Dwarf Iris

    Jan. 24 to Jan. 31

    1 to 2

February

  • Prune your summer flowering shrubs now. Be aware that spring bloomers produced their buds last fall, so pruning them now will result in the loss of flowers. Prune forsythia, quince, spiraea, and other early spring flowering shrubs later, after they have finished flowering. Prune to improve the shape of the plant, as well as to open the center of the plant to good air circulation and sun exposure. Start pruning by removing all dead, decayed or broken branches.
  • Transplant deciduous shrubs and trees that are still dormant. Once the buds swell, it will be too late.
  • Prune fruit trees prior to the start of new growth. Apply dormant oil tree spray for winter protection from insects.
  • Use IMAGE® weed killers on wild onions, poa anna grass, and nutsedge weeds.
  • Start using pre-emergents on pesky early spring weeds. Organic pre-emergents are available.
  • Prune most (but not all) roses. Wait to prune roses that only bloom once a year, such as Lady Banks’ and many old fashioned roses and climbers, until immediately after flowering.
  • Do not forget your Valentine this year! Give knock-out roses that come in bright reds to lighter pink colors and double bloomers.
  • Get materials ready for spring fertilizing. We recommend Holly-tone® for all evergreens; Plant-tone® and Tree-tone® for all perennials and deciduous plants/trees; Turf-tone® for any centipede or bermuda lawn; and Espoma Organic® Lawn Food for fescue and zoysia lawns.
  • Cut back liriope and groundcovers.
  • Continue feeding our feathered friends, who will help with insect control when the weather warms again.

March

  • Start reseeding your fescue lawn or plant seeds in the bare spots when the weather begins to warm.
  • Fertilize your fescue or zoysia lawn with Espoma Organic® Lawn Food.
  • Prune camellias after blooming is complete and feed them with Holly-tone®.
  • Divide perennials as needed before new growth advances.
  • Fertilize houseplants and repot them if needed.
  • Prune roses by trimming 1/3 of the canes on climbers and 18” on hybrid teas. Fertilize with Rose-tone®.
  • Cut back butterfly bushes to 1/3 the size desired this summer.
  • Check gardenias for whiteflies. Use Earth-tone® Insecticidal Soap to control them.
  • Use Earth-tone® Insecticidal Soap or 3-in-1 insecticide to control aphids, lace bugs, mealy bugs, and other pesky bugs on indoor and outdoor plants.
  • Fertilize springs bulbs with 1 pound blood meal per 100 sq/ft of bed.
  • Sow cool season vegetables in mid-March. Begin to prepare soil for the summer garden.
  • Add Living Soil® amender to the garden as an organic additive for new plants.
  • Do not forget pre-emergents for spring week control. Use Espoma Organic® Weed Preventer and Espoma Organic® Lawn Food to control those fast-growing spring weeds.

April

  • Visit Zone 7 around April 1st for the first glance at newly arrived spring color! Annuals and perennials are here!
  • Feed fescue lawns with Espoma Organic® Lawn Food. Set mower height to 2” to 3” for fescue grass.
  • Set out annuals, perennials, and other bedding plants in mid-to-late April. Apply balanced fertilizer, such as Plant-tone®.
  • Plant shrubs, such as loropetalum, viburnums, azaleas and spiraea for late spring color.
  • Remove faded flowers from daffodils, tulips and hyacinths, letting the foliage die naturally.
  • Fertilize bermuda and centipede lawns with Espoma Phosphate Free Organic Lawn Food when grass is at least 50% green.
  • Set out summer-flowering bulbs, such as gladioli and crocosmia.
  • Plant caladium bulbs in pots and begin designing summer container gardens after the danger of frost has passed, usually after April 15th for the Zone 7 area.
  • Fertilize azaleas and camellias immediately after they bloom. Feed other flowering shrubs, if not previously done, with Holly-tone®.
  • Plant summer annuals. Use wave petunias, geraniums and marigolds in the sun, and coleus, impatiens and begonias in the shade.
  • Prune early spring blooming shrubs, like forsythia, azaleas and weigela, after blooming.
  • Watch for pests, such as slugs and snails, especially after a cool, wet spring.
  • Look for tent caterpillars in cherries, crabapples, and plums.
  • Fertilize winter-planted vegetables early in the month.
  • Plant warm season vegetables after the danger of frost has passed.

May

  • Plant annuals for spring and summer enjoyment.
  • Fertilize centipede lawns. Only 1 application per year is necessary.
  • Fertilize and water tomatoes regularly.
  • Plant vines, such as mandevilla, bougainvillea and clematis, at your mailbox for bright flowers all summer.
  • Begin succession planting of hot weather annuals such as zinnias, marigolds, celosia, and portulaca. Continue planting through the month of June.
  • Pinch back annuals to encourage bushy compact growth. Begin to fertilize annuals moderately on a regular basis, as they appreciate a continual supply of nutrients.
  • Plant long-blooming perennials like daylilies, purple coneflowers, shasta daisies and black-eyed susans.
  • Plant dahlia tubers at the end of the month. Set your stakes in the ground at this time.
  • Continue to plant perennials throughout the month.
  • Begin planting vegetables such as okra, pumpkin, sweet potato, eggplant, peppers, peanuts, watermelon, cow peas, black-eyed peas, crowder peas, butter peas and butter beans when the ground temperature is 70°.
  • Mulch garden beds well to regulate soil temperature, retain moisture, and keep weeds down.
  • Do not sow cool season grasses such as fescue, but warm season grasses such as bermuda, centipede, and zoysia can be sown soon. Temperatures have to be at least 60° at night.
  • Use weed killer on lawns only if the temperature is above 70°.
  • Fertilize roses to encourage a second bloom. Continue feeding them on schedule through the month of June.
  • Fertilize azaleas as soon as they finish blooming.
  • Fertilize flowerbeds with Plant-tone®.
  • Fertilize March vegetables with an organic fertilizer such as Garden-tone®.
  • Use Over-N-Out!™ Fire Ant Killer on fire ant mounds. Treat mounds with an insecticide 48 hours later.
  • Use Orthonex Garden Insect & Disease Control to get a start on the coming japanese beetles of summer.

June

  • Plant gardenias in shady locations.
  • Plant hydrangeas and crape myrtles, as they will be blooming soon.
  • Water your lawn in the early morning so the turf will have time to dry before night, preventing disease.
  • Take cuttings for rooting of deciduous and broadleaf evergreen shrubs. Use the air-layering method on hard-to-root plants.
  • Continue planting gladioli bulbs each week through mid-month to obtain a succession of blooms.
  • Plant easy-to-grow kitchen herbs such as basil, oregano, thyme, and rosemary in a sunny spot.
  • Fertilize flowerbeds with Plant-tone®.
  • Plant bulbs such as dahlias, tuberoses, tigridias, and cannas by mid-month.
  • Pull spent vegetables plants, re-till the soil, and plant your second crops. Water these crops as needed.
  • Do not fertilize the garden unless the soil is excessively wet or dry.
  • Prune arborvitaes, junipers, yews and hemlocks.
  • Fertilize camellias and other broadleaf evergreens.
  • Prune ramblers (roses).
  • Clean up spring bulbs once the foliage has completely died back.
  • Cut back bearded iris and divide. Keep japanese iris watered.
  • Do not allow weeds to go to seed. Keep them pulled or spray with KILLZALL Weed & Grass Killer to keep them under control.
  • Watch for harmful insects and disease problems in flowerbeds or the vegetable garden. Plan a different crop in that particular area next year if a problem occurs.
  • Keep the garden adequately watered during the dry weather. A weekly deep and thorough soaking is more beneficial than a daily light sprinkling. Comply with local watering restrictions.
  • Add Soil Moist Granules to pots to absorb water and release it as needed.
  • Prune azaleas after blooming.
  • Watch for seed pods on any repeat blooming daylily varieties. Pinch the pods off in order to continue getting blooms for the remainder of the summer.
  • Pick up a bag of Living Soil® amender to use with any new plantings.

July

  • Keep the garden adequately watered. A weekly deep and thorough soaking is more beneficial than a daily light sprinkling. Plan your water schedule accordingly based on local watering restrictions.
  • Mulch and water azaleas, rhododendrons, and camellias deeply.
  • Brighten shady garden spots with impatiens, variegated hostas, coral bells, and other shade-loving shrubbery.
  • Plant zinnia seeds and enjoy cut flowers in a few weeks.
  • Lay bermuda, zoysia, or centipede sod. Keep sod watered while roots are getting established.
  • Plant centipede or bermuda seed. Allow 3 to 4 weeks for germination.
  • Apply Milorganite® Organic Nitrogen Fertilizer to zoysia and fescue lawns to keep them green without forcing new growth.
  • Fertilize crape myrtles, butterfly bushes and hydrangeas with Plant-tone®.
  • Watch for lace bugs. Use Bayer Advanced™ Tree & Shrub Insect Control Landscape Formula for 12 months of protection.
  • Stake tall annuals and perennials securely so they will remain upright during the afternoon thunderstorms common for this time of year.
  • Keep unwanted dead blooms picked off of all plants to encourage the growth of new flowers, such as knock-out roses.
  • Allow roses to rest through August. Do not fertilize, but continue spraying. Give them a light pruning to encourage new fall growth.
  • Plant bearded iris and divide old clumps.
  • Continue to pinch chrysanthemums and dahlias throughout this month.
  • Cut back wisteria to encourage next year’s bloom.
  • Fertilize azaleas before the fall season.
  • Watch for japanese beetles on all delicate trees and shrubs, such as roses, crape myrtles, althea, cherry trees, and japanese maples. Spray with Seven spray. For longer control, use Bayer Advanced™ Tree & Shrub Insect Control Landscape Formula, which lasts for 12 months.

August

  • Regularly fertilize annuals for continued bloom.
  • Water plants and lawns deeply as allowed by current local watering restrictions.
  • Plant annuals like zinnias and petunias for fall bloom at the beginning of the month.
  • Sow portulaca (moss rose), which will bloom in about 3 weeks from seed.
  • Accessorize your garden with arbors, benches, and statuaries.
  • Pull spent annuals, such as cone flowers, black-eyed susans, and blanket-flowers. Shake them so seeds will fall where plants will grow next year.
  • Divide japanese iris.
  • Watch for fire ant mounds. Use Over-N-Out!™ Fire Ant Killer to eliminate ants until winter.
  • Feed chrysanthemums every 2 weeks with a liquid fertilizer, such as Super Bloom®, until the flower buds begin to show color.
  • Watch for insect pests and diseases.
  • Keep weeds pulled to prevent them from going to seed.
  • Fertilize vegetables every 4 to 6 weeks.
  • Start seeds of broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, and onions in trays. Sow bush beans, cucumbers, and squash directly in the ground.
  • Sow fescue to repair lawns in the last week of the month if the weather is cool.
  • Remove faded flowers from crape myrtles to encourage a second flush of blooms.
  • Prune hydrangeas after they are finished blooming.
  • Cut back leggy annuals by half and fertilize them with Plant-tone®.
  • Start planning your fall flower garden.

September

  • Visit Zone 7 around September 1st to pick out fall color for your yard!
  • Plant trees, shrubs and perennials. Enjoy fall blooming shrubs such as Encore azaleas and camellias. Add fall color with a maple, burning bush, and nandina.
  • Divide or transplant spring blooming perennials.
  • Fertilize fescue mid-month with Espoma Phosphate Free Organic® Lawn Food.
  • Plant fescue seed, protecting the seed with straw and keeping it moist for 2 to 3 weeks.
  • Plant pansies for a full range of color in the garden.
  • Plant perennials, such as asters, mums and ornamental grasses for fall color.
  • Plant cool season vegetable seeds, such as cabbage, lettuce, beets, turnips, spinach, radishes, collards, and broccoli.
  • Do not fertilize zoysia, centipede, or bermuda lawns after this time, allowing them to prepare for dormancy.
  • Fertilize all shrubs with Holly-tone®, using ½ the spring dose.
  • Fertilize perennials and trees with Plant-tone®.
  • Apply Amaze® Grass and Weed Preventer to all beds to stop weeds from germinating.
  • Prune loropetalums, holly and gardenias. Do not prune camellias, azaleas, or forsythias.
  • Lay warm season sod now or wait until next season.

October

  • Plant trees, shrubs, and perennials. Enjoy fall blooming shrubs such as azaleas and camellias. Add fall color with a maple, burning bush, and nandina.
  • Divide or transplant spring blooming perennials.
  • Fertilize fescue mid-month with Espoma Phosphate Free Organic® Lawn Food.
  • Continue to plant fescue seed until around the 15th of the month. Protect the seed with straw, keeping it moist for 2 to 3 weeks.
  • Plant pansies, snapdragons and violas for a boost of color in the garden.
  • Plant perennials such as asters, mums and ornamental grasses for fall color.
  • Plant cool season vegetable seeds, such as cabbage, lettuce, beets, turnips, spinach, radishes, collards, and broccoli.
  • Fertilize all shrubs with Holly-tone®, using ½ the spring dose.
  • Fertilize perennials and trees with Plant-tone®.
  • Apply Amaze® Grass and Weed Preventer to all beds to stop weeds from germinating.
  • Prune loropetalums, holly, and gardenias. Do not prune camellias, azaleas or forshythias.
  • Apply weed preventer to fescue, bermuda, zoysia and centepide lawns to control poa annua.
  • Reduce mowing height on fescue to 2” to 3”.

November

  • Plant pansies, violas and snapdragons for color in the garden.
  • Plant cool season vegetable seeds such as cabbage, lettuce, turnips, spinach, radishes, collards and broccoli.
  • Divide or transplant spring blooming perennials.
  • Fertilize pansy beds with bloodmeal or Super Bloom®.
  • Fertilize your fescue lawn with Espoma Phosphate Free Organic® Lawn Food for a greener lawn throughout the winter and early spring.
  • Plant Otto Luyken laurels, aucubas and holly. Water deeply every 2 weeks to prevent evergreen shrubs from drying out.
  • Plant camellias, the jewel of the winter garden. Dig a hole at least 2 times as wide as the root-ball for planting. Choose from japonica and sasanqua varieties.
  • Cut back faded perennials for the winter.
  • Add feeders to bring lots of color and activity to the winter garden. Black oil sunflowers attract the best variety of birds.
  • Start holiday decorating with garland, trees, lights and wreaths.
  • Plant shrubs and large trees for the spring season. Planting while dormant gives the shrub or tree a better chance of survival as opposed to planting during the harsh dryness of the summer season.
  • Apply Amaze® Grass and Weed Preventer to all beds to stop weeds from germinating.
  • Reduce mowing height on fescue to 2” to 3”.

December

  • Spray dormant oil on all evergreens to protect them from insect damage.
  • Plant daffodil, hyacinths, crocus and tulip bulbs for spring blooms.
  • Fertilize pansies.
  • Prune holiday clippings. Use juniper, magnolia and fir cuttings in wreaths and table/mantel pieces for the holidays.
  • Plant woody vines like Carolina jessamine, american wisteria and cross vine for pergolas, trellises and arbors.
  • Cut off dry stems and foliage of hostas, purple coneflowers, black-eyed susans and other perennials that die back after the first frost.
  • Remove low hanging and damaged limbs from trees. Prune away some of the crowded limbs along the trunk of bradford pear trees.
  • Plant balled and burlap trees. Plant in a hole at least 2 times the size of the root-ball.
  • Put out feeders with thistle seed to attract yellow finches. Sunflower seed is recommended for general feeding.
  • Keep holiday plants in the coolest indoor spot so the flowers and leaves will not drop off prematurely.
  • Try something new for the holidays such as heather, white hydrangeas, red and white azaleas and amaryllis.
  • Place indoor plants near southern exposed windows.
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